Denver sits at the confluence of several major Colorado and interstate highways. That is good news for getting around, but it leads to a high rate of major collisions in the area.

As shown in the Denver Regional Council of Governments truck accident map, the vast majority of truck accidents take place on the heavily traveled regional roadway systems, such as I-25 and I-70/270. It is striking to see the long trail of incident markers travel out from the city to the west and south. However, the numbers do not tell the whole story.

A small blue dot on a map does not show the damage and distress caused by these events. It can happen in a moment, but an accident may have lifelong consequences — even if handled correctly. Without proper planning, individual victims tend to end up in a less advantageous position after negotiations than do the seasoned teams representing the commercial driver’s interests.

One of the highest priorities people have after a truck crash is getting the funds necessary to put their lives back together. Unfortunately, delays are frequent; collisions involving commercial vehicles are notoriously complex when heavily contested. There are often many parties involved, such as transportation companies, drivers and insurance companies, and each may have its own agenda.

Luckily, truck disputes often settle out of court. As explained on FindLaw, settlements have advantages and disadvantages. As such, even if the goal is a quick settlement, it is often beneficial to prepare a case with the possibility in mind that litigation may be necessary.

The FindLaw resource covers many major points surrounding truck settlements. However, each situation is different — these agreements are often the result of a fine analysis of the details of a specific case.