Texting while driving in Colorado is often treated as a teenage problem, but the truth is that adults are just as guilty. In fact, according to CNN, adults are more likely to be texting while driving than teens. Even so, distracted driving is far more dangerous when there is a teenager at the wheel. From snapping selfies of themselves driving to responding to text messages, teenagers often put themselves and other drivers at risk.

Many parents are surprised when their teenagers confess that they would or already do text and drive. Experts do not find this strange at all. They note that it is difficult for teens to ignore a distraction that already consumes their everyday life. When that phone goes off, the first impulse is often to reach for it. Who is it? What did the person say? Is it urgent?

Because of this, many companies have stepped forward with solutions to make phones less appealing while driving. For one app, once a car goes over 10 miles per hour, the phone goes into safe mode. This prevents, texting, surfing the net or emailing. Android and Apple phones also have drive mode technology built in that can simplify the phone display and mute notifications.

According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, fellow teens are the best people to deliver messages about safety. More teens need to speak up when they see friends texting or driving, or even when parents are the offenders. However, at an age when so many teens are trying their hardest to fit in and not to rock the boat, speaking up may be a lot harder than it looks.